Saturday, October 12, 2019

The Unscrupulous Iago of Shakespeares Othello Essay -- Othello essays

In William Shakespeare's play, Othello, there is an example of evil personified. He is the character of Iago, and he wreaks havoc and destruction on all those under his influence. As the play develops, we see unfolded a plethora of lies, deceptions and clever schemes. Iago seizes every opportunity to advance his malicious plan to his advantage. Greed and jealousy play a major role as a motive for his various schemes. Iago first reveals his cunning and unscrupulous behavior in his encounter with Rodrigo.   Iago easily controls Rodrigo and he is very aware of his power over him.   He plans to use his influence over him for his own good.   He shows this by saying "Thus do I ever make my fool my purse; For I mine own gained knowledge should profane If I would time expend with such a snipe".   We learn that Iago has a secret hatred for both Othello and Cassio.   Iago says he hates Othello because he has denied Iago a promotion and for Cassio because he now occupies Iago's desired position of lieutenant.   His motive is to seek revenge upon both these characters.   Rodrigo has a shared hatred for Othello for his own and when he suggests he would not serve him, Iago reveilles his scheming plan for Othello by saying to him "O, sir, content you.   I will follow him to serve my turn upon him."   By saying this Iago shows that he plans to cleverly trick Othello of being loyal to him and th en eventually use him for his own ends.   In his first attempt to bring down Othello, he and Rodrigo tell Brabantio that Othello has kidnapped his daughter Desdemona.   This is a dishonorable act as this is definitely a lie and told to Desdemona's father only to anger him towards Othello.   Brabantio is also a senator and has the power to dismiss Othello from hi... ...s. "Two Worldviews Echo Each Other." Readings on The Tragedies. Ed. Clarice Swisher. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 1996. Reprint from Shakespeare: The Pattern in His Carpet. N.p.: n.p., 1970. Gardner, Helen. "Othello: A Tragedy of Beauty and Fortune." Readings on The Tragedies. Ed. Clarice Swisher. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 1996. Reprint from "The Noble Moor." British Academy Lectures, no. 9, 1955. Shakespeare, William. Othello. In The Electric Shakespeare. Princeton University. 1996. http://www.eiu.edu/~multilit/studyabroad/othello/othello_all.html No line nos. Wright, Louis B. and Virginia A. LaMar. "The Engaging Qualities of Othello." Readings on The Tragedies. Ed. Clarice Swisher. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 1996. Reprint from Introduction to The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice by William Shakespeare. N. p.: Simon and Schuster, Inc., 1957.

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